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Miracle Workers Season 1 Stills
marcie - Apr 24, 2020 Gallery Update , Miracle Workers , TV

New stills from Miracle Workers Season 1 have been posted there are more to post so I will do that very soon. Stills have been posted from most episodes except episode 4 and 6.

Television > 2018 | Miracle Workers > Season 1 > Stills > Episode 001 | 2 Weeks

Television > 2018 | Miracle Workers > Season 1 > Promotional Photos

Miracle Workers: Dark Ages
marcie - Apr 3, 2020 Miracle Workers , TV

New stills for episodes 9 and 10. You can preview those in our gallery.

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > STILLS > EPISODE 009

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > STILLS > EPISODE 010

Miracle Workers Dark Ages Captures
marcie - Mar 31, 2020 Miracle Workers , TV

I uploaded new captures from episodes 8 and 9 to the gallery a few days ago. Episode 10 is premiering tomorrow so captures of those will be coming very soon. You can view a clip from episode 10 down below.

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > CAPTURES > EPISODE 008 | FIRST DATE

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > CAPTURES > EPISODE 009 | MOVING OUT PART 1

Miracle Workers: Dark Ages History Lesson
marcie - Mar 28, 2020 Miracle Workers , TV

The video down below was originally released on Twitter in separate parts. If you missed them you can see them all below.

The Dark Ages were a very weird time. Daniel Radcliffe is here to give you a brief history lesson of the Dark Ages.

We also have screen captures from episodes 5-7. And currently working on 8 and 9. One new pic has been added also from Episode 9. You can also view it on our facebook group: Miracle Workers Dark Ages

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | Miracle Workers > Season 2 > Captures > Episode 005 | Holiday

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | Miracle Workers > Season 2 > Captures > Episode 006 | Music Festival

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | Miracle Workers > Season 2 > Captures > Episode 007 | Day in Court

Miracle Workers Dark Ages
marcie - Mar 13, 2020 Miracle Workers , TV

Huge Update for Miracle Workers Dark Ages. 42 new stills have been posted from episodes 1-7. Including 14 Promotional photos from the Season.

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > STILLS > EPISODE 007

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > PROMOTIONAL

Miracle Workers Dark Ages Captures
marcie - Feb 24, 2020 Miracle Workers , TV

New captures from Episodes 2-4. You can view it all in our gallery. Thanks to the help of Rory for sorting them.

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > CAPTURES > EPISODE 002 | HELP WANTED

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > CAPTURES > EPISODE 003 | ROAD TRIP

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > CAPTURES > EPISODE 004 | INTERNSHIP

People Interview
marcie - Feb 17, 2020 Magazines , Miracle Workers , People , TV

With the promotion of Miracle Workers Dark Ages Dan did the People magazine’s One Last Thing Interview from the February 17th issue. You can read the high res version in our gallery.

MAGAZINES > PEOPLE

Screen Captures of Miracle Workers: Dark Ages
marcie - Jan 29, 2020 Miracle Workers , TV

I’ve done 273 screen captures for the first episode of Miracle Workers: Dark Ages. You can view them in the gallery.

TELEVISION SHOWS > 2018 | MIRACLE WORKERS > SEASON 2 > CAPTURES > EPISODE 001 | GRADUATION

USA Today Interview
marcie - Jan 29, 2020 Dan News , Miracle Workers , TV

“Dark Ages” is the second installment of the “Miracle Workers” anthology series, created by Simon Rich (FXX’s “Man Seeking Woman”) and both starring Radcliffe, Steve Buscemi and Geraldine Viswanathan. But while Season 1 was based on Rich’s 2013 book “What in God’s Name” and followed low-level angels in a corporate version of heaven, Season 2 is set in Medieval times, as the bumbling Chauncley grapples with inheriting the throne from his bloodthirsty father (Peter Serafinowicz). 

Radcliffe, 30, says “Dark Ages” is “Game of Thrones” meets “The Simpsons,” and strikes a unique tone of being “sweet and charming, but also very profane and stupid and funny.” He chats with USA TODAY about the show, and life after “Harry Potter.” 

Question: What are some similarities between your characters Craig (in Season 1) and Chauncley (in Season 2)? 

Daniel Radcliffe: They’re both socially inept but come from completely different places. Craig’s social ineptitude is caused by him being overly analytical and self-aware, whereas Chauncley has no self-awareness. He starts as someone who’s psychotically stupid, and his journey is one of starting to become a good person by the end. It’s a very different role for me – I’ve never done anything this broad before. It’s very hard to find a grounded and subtle way of playing someone who dances with ducks. 

Q: Given the medieval setting, did you have to learn how to swordfight or ride horses? 

Radcliffe: I got out of that, thankfully. When we were first doing the show, I was like, “I’m definitely going to have to ride.” I can get on a horse and go from point A to point B, but I don’t love it. I also didn’t have to do any sort of fighting, because my character’s a coward. Really, the only thing I had to do was called “duck training,” where I’d stand there for 10 minutes, and the (animal handlers) would be like, “Pick up the duck. Now put it down again. Cool, need anything else from us?” 

Q: Aside from the cast, are there any connective threads between the stories in seasons 1 and 2?  

Radcliffe: We discovered some as we were going along, but I don’t even know if they’re intentional. It’s really little things, like a scene where me and Geraldine’s character end up spreading a map out on a table and poring over it and working out a plan, which is an echo of something from the first season, (which was) thematically about finding the bravery to be yourself. And the second has a more parental theme: How do we love our parents, and how do we move away from (them)? But done in the craziest, most heightened context.  

Q: You’ve appeared in Broadway shows, independent films and now TV series in the decade since “Harry Potter.” What was the most difficult part of making that transition? 

Radcliffe: There’s a lovely thing, which is that I’m open to some weirder stuff. Well, maybe other people say it’s weird, but I just think it’s fun. And weird begets weird, so then you become known for responding to those scripts and get sent (them). What I had to learn is that I’m in a position very few actors are in, which is you have autonomy over your career. And because “Potter” has been very good to me financially, you can pick and choose some (projects) purely because it makes you happy. 

There was a stage where I thought I should be doing a certain type of film, and it was a very valuable lesson to learn that, “Oh, I shouldn’t necessarily do something because it’s the right thing to do on paper.” I was very worried at the end of “Potter,” because I didn’t know what the future was going to be or what my life was like without that thing. But if you told me then that in 10 years, I’d have made films like “Horns” and “Kill Your Darlings” and “Guns Akimbo” and “Swiss Army Man,” I’d have bitten your hand off. “Potter” was this amazing start, and then I had to step back and say, “OK, what do you want your career to be?”

Q: I spoke to your “Harry Potter” co-star Rupert Grint, who said he recently re-watched “Sorcerer’s Stone” (released in 2001, when Radcliffe was just 11 years old). Have you seen any of the movies lately? 

Radcliffe: Yeah, I was at the gym on Thanksgiving and it was just on on a loop on some channel. I came into the gym and there was a little bit of recognition at the door, but it settled down and I was like, “OK, cool, cool.” And then I get on the treadmill and look up, and it’s (expletive) me in the third film (“Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”)! It’s funny. I don’t know if I can watch them, just because I don’t know if I’m ready for that opioid-level hit of nostalgia. It would be too much of a mixture of sadness and happiness and embarrassment. But I will watch them again at some point. It’s definitely not something I seek out, though. 

Source: USAToday

Entertainment Weekly Interview
marcie - Jan 29, 2020 Dan News , Endgame , Miracle Workers , Stage , TV

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: When you signed on to the first season of Miracle Workers, there was always the plan to make it an anthology series. How did Simon decide on this Dark Ages setting and story line?
DANIEL RADCLIFFE: Simon is somebody who is a bit of a history nerd, and Simon’s brain looked at a lot of the potential situations in that world and just saw something he could make very, very funny. There is some stuff in the show that is really obviously heightened, that is very crazy, but it’s not that far off from the kind of stuff that was going on in medieval Europe. We have a goat on trial, and that is actually something that is completely true and something that happened with semi-regularity in medieval Europe. There really were animals put on trial for things, so it’s quite rich pickings for comedy.

The first season played with our common perceptions of the afterlife and God, and this is certainly a different take on the Middle Ages than we’re used to seeing — less Game of Thrones, more medieval sitcom. What do you most enjoy about the expectations or world this is subverting?
As you say, it complicates people’s notions of what these archetypes of certain characters would be, and Simon finds the means to subvert them. My character, for instance, is essentially a stupid prince in the way you might expect one to exist, but then we gradually watch him become more human as the series goes on. With how beautiful the sets are and how well lit it is, it has the look of Game of Thrones, but the jokes and the format of The Simpsons.

It’s so fun to see this repertory company of actors shaking things up, taking on very different roles from season 1. Did you draw straws for them? How did that all shake out?
No, not at all. My one request, or the thing I was most excited about, was that we would actually all be on set together for this series, because certain structural things in the first [season] — I never had scenes with Jon Bass, for example, because he was on earth and I was in heaven. I was very excited to actually have the cast all combined for this series this time around, and get to do stuff with them. It was me, Steve, and Geraldine’s characters that I remember Simon talking about first. The joy of working with somebody like Simon is that I don’t know if there’s anybody else that I know well enough that I could just trust and be like, “Whatever you write for the next few years, I will be happy to perform.” I am in such awe of his ability. I’ve been in the writers’ room with him and watched him be forensic and amazing about a story in a way that I have admiration for. I feel very safe in his hands. I would pretty much do whatever he writes — I have to be careful saying that.

Your character has… I guess we could call it an affinity for ducks. What is one surprising thing you learned from working with live ducks?
[Laughs] It’s unfortunate to say that the one thing I learned about them is that they smell worse than you’d expect, but there was a lot of duck s— happening when you’ve got multiple ducks on set, and it is a very distinctive smell. Karan Soni will confirm that once you’ve smelt it, it’s a smell you can identify anywhere, and as soon as they’re around you’re like, “Oh, the ducks are here.” They’re quite hard to train. Originally it was going to be geese, and they were like, “No, geese are a nightmare. That’s not going to happen.” We had three ducks that were the main ducks — they were called in British film terminology the hero ducks — and they would be brought to set. They were very good. You would set them in a certain spot and they would kind of do what they were told, and then you would get the other ducks on set and it’d be like, “Okay, let’s see what happens.”

It sounds like a bit of a clusterduck.
[Laughs] Yes, you could say that. I can’t believe I never thought of that in 10 weeks of filming!

How would you describe Chauncley, and in particular his relationship with his father? What journey can we expect this season?
At the beginning, Chauncley is intensely lonely and psychotically stupid. He’s an individual who has no empathy or self-awareness whatsoever, and the journey throughout — he meets Alexandra, Geraldine’s character, and she begins to open him up to a new world and between her and Karan, he gradually learns he does not have to follow in his tyrannical father’s footsteps. [She] helps him become more human and nice toward the end.

You and Geraldine have an easy rapport and natural chemistry. Is that story one of friendship or her making you more politically aware?
That friendship grows and maybe blossoms into something else, but Chauncley’s obviously not very good at that. He doesn’t really know what to do with these new feelings. But it is also about her just making him realize that there is life outside of the castle, and there is life outside of the line of murderous tyrants that he comes from. He does not necessarily have to follow in their footsteps. I would say that she learns stuff from me, but I don’t think she does — I think I just kind of help out at key moments, but it’s very rare that I’m speaking out as a character. Chauncley does not have a lot of speeches, bless him.

This is the first project you’ve done since Harry Potter where you got to have that experience of coming back together as a group to tell a story with deepened relationships and familiarity with one other — but now with the added element of taking on a new set of characters. If you had the luxury of doing that on Potter, which character would you have wanted to jump into?
Oh God, I guess Lupin and Sirius Black are both incredibly cool characters. Though I have to say, it’s also [because] I probably am biased a little because I love both the actors [David Thewlis and Gary Oldman] that played them. But yeah, I’d probably have to say one of those two.

You’ve been in rehearsals for Endgame on the West End, and I saw Alan Cumming’s photo with your director’s notes saying, “Actors fried.” You’ve done classic musical theater, Martin McDonagh, Peter Shaffer. Where does Beckett rank in difficulty level for you, in terms of language and approach?
Right up there at the very top. It’s tough, and I’m so glad I’m subjected to it with Alan and with [director] Richard Jones. It’s an amazing team that I’m getting to work with. It’s really tricky material, and it requires a lot of precision. Hopefully, it will come out right. But you’re definitely talking to me at a period of rehearsals where I’m like, “Oh my God.” It really is the hardest thing I’ve done.

Prince Chauncley is a bit more song-and-dance than warmonger. Do you want to do another musical, and if so do you have one in particular you want to do?
I would love to do another musical, but you have to genuinely commit for a long time. That’s not the case with plays, normally. You generally have to commit for a lot longer, and then you have to really love it. You have to absolutely know going in. You have to love doing that show, and be able to love it for a year. So I definitely want to do a musical again, but I’m not going to do it until I’m sure of that.


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